Remember – Leaving Cert results do not determine the future

Not all students will get desired results but there are ways to lessen the feelings of failure

Anne McCormack  Irish Times – Tuesday 11th August 2015

Planning ahead and thinking about ways to cope with possible disappointment may be useful for results day.

Disappointment is an inevitable part of life. Everyone feels it at some point and it can be a difficult feeling for any person to bear. But disappointment has value, as all emotions do. Disappointment is of great value, as it bears witness to hope.

Many young people have high hopes on Leaving Cert results day. These hopes often relate to receiving enough points to access the third-level course of their choice. And some might feel disappointment.

While the prospect of planning for the possibility of disappointment may seem pessimistic, it is worth giving the possibility some thought.

It gives you the chance to become prepared psychologically, in case disappointment on Leaving Cert results day enters the frame.

Here are some ways to think about and deal with disappointment. By taking the time to reflect on these ideas, young people will be more prepared to handle this difficult emotion, and the disappointment will then be less likely to overwhelm.

Tuning in to thoughts as well as feelings

Disappointment can be intense. It can seem as if the event, the Leaving Cert results, is directly causing this unwanted feeling: I got this result, therefore I feel disappointment. It is important to know that it is the thoughts about the event, rather than just the event itself, that causes the feeling to arise. Therefore, I got this result and am now thinking this, is the cause of the feeling. By tuning into and by challenging these thoughts, young people can gain strength and influence over their emotional self and feel better.

Plan who to talk to for support

It can be useful for young people to think ahead and make a plan about who they will talk to if they are feeling disappointed.

If a young person’s peer group are all receiving results on the same day, it could be that a trusted friend may be largely unavailable to offer emotional support that particular day, if required. Someone at home, perhaps a parent, could be in a better position to really listen to how the young person is feeling.

For a parent to offer this support is useful. Then, by listening to the expression of disappointment, parents can check in with the young person about what they are thinking about. This provides an opportunity to steer their thinking away from negative thoughts which could damage their self-esteem.

 

Take a wider, longer-term view

There is always more than one way to get from A to B but on results day, it is hard to remember this as many young people have route A, their preferred first choice, very much in mind. No matter what career a young person has set their heart on, there is always the possibility of pursuing that goal, no matter what the exam results are.

It is important for parents to remind young people of this, ahead of results day as well as on the day itself, if they are feeling disappointed. It is also good to remind young people not to put pressure on themselves to figure out an alternative route straight away.

Taking a few days to process the emotions they are feeling is enough for the young person to deal with.

 

Celebrate effort more than results

There is a lot of emphasis placed on the points system and the number of points received. This can create the impression that results matter more than effort, but that is not necessarily the case.

In many areas of life, whether it is within relationships, within a workplace context or pursuing a life goal, effort matters a very great deal indeed.

Young people on results day may believe that results matter more than effort. But holding this belief does not make it a fact. It is vital for young people to be reminded of the validity and importance of effort. It is vital also that they be encouraged to celebrate effort, rather than just results.

Celebrating efforts made throughout the exam period and throughout the school life has much merit. Parents can take a lead by placing focus on and congratulating effort.

 

IQ versus EQ

The Leaving Cert does not take account of many an individual’s worthy qualities. Points are not awarded for kindness, a person’s level of honesty or a person’s social skills and yet these qualities matter a very great deal.

Research from Harvard Business School showed that emotional intelligence was twice as important as intellectual intelligence and technical skill when it came to determining who would be successful in life. In order for a person to become emotionally intelligent, a person must be able to experience empathy.

In order to experience empathy, a person must first be able to tune into and feel their own emotions deeply. There is an opportunity with disappointment to do just this; to feel deeply, to bear difficult emotion. And that can be a significant aspect of success.

Results day is significant, but it does not determine how the future will be. Young people may need to be reminded of that.

Anne Mc Cormack is a family therapist accredited to FTAI & ICP.

Not all students will get desired results but there are ways to lessen the feelings of failure

Anne McCormack Irish Times – Tuesday 11th August 2015

Planning ahead and thinking about ways to cope with possible disappointment may be useful for results day.

Disappointment is an inevitable part of life. Everyone feels it at some point and it can be a difficult feeling for any person to bear. But disappointment has value, as all emotions do. Disappointment is of great value, as it bears witness to hope.

Many young people have high hopes on Leaving Cert results day. These hopes often relate to receiving enough points to access the third-level course of their choice. And some might feel disappointment.

While the prospect of planning for the possibility of disappointment may seem pessimistic, it is worth giving the possibility some thought.

It gives you the chance to become prepared psychologically, in case disappointment on Leaving Cert results day enters the frame.

Here are some ways to think about and deal with disappointment. By taking the time to reflect on these ideas, young people will be more prepared to handle this difficult emotion, and the disappointment will then be less likely to overwhelm.
Tuning in to thoughts as well as feelings

Disappointment can be intense. It can seem as if the event, the Leaving Cert results, is directly causing this unwanted feeling: I got this result, therefore I feel disappointment. It is important to know that it is the thoughts about the event, rather than just the event itself, that causes the feeling to arise. Therefore, I got this result and am now thinking this, is the cause of the feeling. By tuning into and by challenging these thoughts, young people can gain strength and influence over their emotional self and feel better.
Plan who to talk to for support

It can be useful for young people to think ahead and make a plan about who they will talk to if they are feeling disappointed.

If a young person’s peer group are all receiving results on the same day, it could be that a trusted friend may be largely unavailable to offer emotional support that particular day, if required. Someone at home, perhaps a parent, could be in a better position to really listen to how the young person is feeling.

For a parent to offer this support is useful. Then, by listening to the expression of disappointment, parents can check in with the young person about what they are thinking about. This provides an opportunity to steer their thinking away from negative thoughts which could damage their self-esteem.

Take a wider, longer-term view

There is always more than one way to get from A to B but on results day, it is hard to remember this as many young people have route A, their preferred first choice, very much in mind. No matter what career a young person has set their heart on, there is always the possibility of pursuing that goal, no matter what the exam results are.

It is important for parents to remind young people of this, ahead of results day as well as on the day itself, if they are feeling disappointed. It is also good to remind young people not to put pressure on themselves to figure out an alternative route straight away.

Taking a few days to process the emotions they are feeling is enough for the young person to deal with.

Celebrate effort more than results

There is a lot of emphasis placed on the points system and the number of points received. This can create the impression that results matter more than effort, but that is not necessarily the case.

In many areas of life, whether it is within relationships, within a workplace context or pursuing a life goal, effort matters a very great deal indeed.

Young people on results day may believe that results matter more than effort. But holding this belief does not make it a fact. It is vital for young people to be reminded of the validity and importance of effort. It is vital also that they be encouraged to celebrate effort, rather than just results.

Celebrating efforts made throughout the exam period and throughout the school life has much merit. Parents can take a lead by placing focus on and congratulating effort.

IQ versus EQ

The Leaving Cert does not take account of many an individual’s worthy qualities. Points are not awarded for kindness, a person’s level of honesty or a person’s social skills and yet these qualities matter a very great deal.

Research from Harvard Business School showed that emotional intelligence was twice as important as intellectual intelligence and technical skill when it came to determining who would be successful in life. In order for a person to become emotionally intelligent, a person must be able to experience empathy.

In order to experience empathy, a person must first be able to tune into and feel their own emotions deeply. There is an opportunity with disappointment to do just this; to feel deeply, to bear difficult emotion. And that can be a significant aspect of success.

Results day is significant, but it does not determine how the future will be. Young people may need to be reminded of that.
Anne Mc Cormack is a family therapist accredited to FTAI & ICP.

Not all students will get desired results but there are ways to lessen the feelings of failure

Anne McCormack  Irish Times – Tuesday 11th August 2015

Planning ahead and thinking about ways to cope with possible disappointment may be useful for results day.

Disappointment is an inevitable part of life. Everyone feels it at some point and it can be a difficult feeling for any person to bear. But disappointment has value, as all emotions do. Disappointment is of great value, as it bears witness to hope.

Many young people have high hopes on Leaving Cert results day. These hopes often relate to receiving enough points to access the third-level course of their choice. And some might feel disappointment.

While the prospect of planning for the possibility of disappointment may seem pessimistic, it is worth giving the possibility some thought.

It gives you the chance to become prepared psychologically, in case disappointment on Leaving Cert results day enters the frame.

Here are some ways to think about and deal with disappointment. By taking the time to reflect on these ideas, young people will be more prepared to handle this difficult emotion, and the disappointment will then be less likely to overwhelm.

Tuning in to thoughts as well as feelings

Disappointment can be intense. It can seem as if the event, the Leaving Cert results, is directly causing this unwanted feeling: I got this result, therefore I feel disappointment. It is important to know that it is the thoughts about the event, rather than just the event itself, that causes the feeling to arise. Therefore, I got this result and am now thinking this, is the cause of the feeling. By tuning into and by challenging these thoughts, young people can gain strength and influence over their emotional self and feel better.

Plan who to talk to for support

It can be useful for young people to think ahead and make a plan about who they will talk to if they are feeling disappointed.

If a young person’s peer group are all receiving results on the same day, it could be that a trusted friend may be largely unavailable to offer emotional support that particular day, if required. Someone at home, perhaps a parent, could be in a better position to really listen to how the young person is feeling.

For a parent to offer this support is useful. Then, by listening to the expression of disappointment, parents can check in with the young person about what they are thinking about. This provides an opportunity to steer their thinking away from negative thoughts which could damage their self-esteem.

 

Take a wider, longer-term view

There is always more than one way to get from A to B but on results day, it is hard to remember this as many young people have route A, their preferred first choice, very much in mind. No matter what career a young person has set their heart on, there is always the possibility of pursuing that goal, no matter what the exam results are.

It is important for parents to remind young people of this, ahead of results day as well as on the day itself, if they are feeling disappointed. It is also good to remind young people not to put pressure on themselves to figure out an alternative route straight away.

Taking a few days to process the emotions they are feeling is enough for the young person to deal with.

 

Celebrate effort more than results

There is a lot of emphasis placed on the points system and the number of points received. This can create the impression that results matter more than effort, but that is not necessarily the case.

In many areas of life, whether it is within relationships, within a workplace context or pursuing a life goal, effort matters a very great deal indeed.

Young people on results day may believe that results matter more than effort. But holding this belief does not make it a fact. It is vital for young people to be reminded of the validity and importance of effort. It is vital also that they be encouraged to celebrate effort, rather than just results.

Celebrating efforts made throughout the exam period and throughout the school life has much merit. Parents can take a lead by placing focus on and congratulating effort.

 

IQ versus EQ

The Leaving Cert does not take account of many an individual’s worthy qualities. Points are not awarded for kindness, a person’s level of honesty or a person’s social skills and yet these qualities matter a very great deal.

Research from Harvard Business School showed that emotional intelligence was twice as important as intellectual intelligence and technical skill when it came to determining who would be successful in life. In order for a person to become emotionally intelligent, a person must be able to experience empathy.

In order to experience empathy, a person must first be able to tune into and feel their own emotions deeply. There is an opportunity with disappointment to do just this; to feel deeply, to bear difficult emotion. And that can be a significant aspect of success.

Results day is significant, but it does not determine how the future will be. Young people may need to be reminded of that.

Anne Mc Cormack is a family therapist accredited to FTAI & ICP.

Not all students will get desired results but there are ways to lessen the feelings of failure

Anne McCormack  Irish Times – Tuesday 11th August 2015

Planning ahead and thinking about ways to cope with possible disappointment may be useful for results day.

Disappointment is an inevitable part of life. Everyone feels it at some point and it can be a difficult feeling for any person to bear. But disappointment has value, as all emotions do. Disappointment is of great value, as it bears witness to hope.

Many young people have high hopes on Leaving Cert results day. These hopes often relate to receiving enough points to access the third-level course of their choice. And some might feel disappointment.

While the prospect of planning for the possibility of disappointment may seem pessimistic, it is worth giving the possibility some thought.

It gives you the chance to become prepared psychologically, in case disappointment on Leaving Cert results day enters the frame.

Here are some ways to think about and deal with disappointment. By taking the time to reflect on these ideas, young people will be more prepared to handle this difficult emotion, and the disappointment will then be less likely to overwhelm.

Tuning in to thoughts as well as feelings

Disappointment can be intense. It can seem as if the event, the Leaving Cert results, is directly causing this unwanted feeling: I got this result, therefore I feel disappointment. It is important to know that it is the thoughts about the event, rather than just the event itself, that causes the feeling to arise. Therefore, I got this result and am now thinking this, is the cause of the feeling. By tuning into and by challenging these thoughts, young people can gain strength and influence over their emotional self and feel better.

Plan who to talk to for support

It can be useful for young people to think ahead and make a plan about who they will talk to if they are feeling disappointed.

If a young person’s peer group are all receiving results on the same day, it could be that a trusted friend may be largely unavailable to offer emotional support that particular day, if required. Someone at home, perhaps a parent, could be in a better position to really listen to how the young person is feeling.

For a parent to offer this support is useful. Then, by listening to the expression of disappointment, parents can check in with the young person about what they are thinking about. This provides an opportunity to steer their thinking away from negative thoughts which could damage their self-esteem.

 

Take a wider, longer-term view

There is always more than one way to get from A to B but on results day, it is hard to remember this as many young people have route A, their preferred first choice, very much in mind. No matter what career a young person has set their heart on, there is always the possibility of pursuing that goal, no matter what the exam results are.

It is important for parents to remind young people of this, ahead of results day as well as on the day itself, if they are feeling disappointed. It is also good to remind young people not to put pressure on themselves to figure out an alternative route straight away.

Taking a few days to process the emotions they are feeling is enough for the young person to deal with.

 

Celebrate effort more than results

There is a lot of emphasis placed on the points system and the number of points received. This can create the impression that results matter more than effort, but that is not necessarily the case.

In many areas of life, whether it is within relationships, within a workplace context or pursuing a life goal, effort matters a very great deal indeed.

Young people on results day may believe that results matter more than effort. But holding this belief does not make it a fact. It is vital for young people to be reminded of the validity and importance of effort. It is vital also that they be encouraged to celebrate effort, rather than just results.

Celebrating efforts made throughout the exam period and throughout the school life has much merit. Parents can take a lead by placing focus on and congratulating effort.

 

IQ versus EQ

The Leaving Cert does not take account of many an individual’s worthy qualities. Points are not awarded for kindness, a person’s level of honesty or a person’s social skills and yet these qualities matter a very great deal.

Research from Harvard Business School showed that emotional intelligence was twice as important as intellectual intelligence and technical skill when it came to determining who would be successful in life. In order for a person to become emotionally intelligent, a person must be able to experience empathy.

In order to experience empathy, a person must first be able to tune into and feel their own emotions deeply. There is an opportunity with disappointment to do just this; to feel deeply, to bear difficult emotion. And that can be a significant aspect of success.

Results day is significant, but it does not determine how the future will be. Young people may need to be reminded of that.

Anne Mc Cormack is a family therapist accredited to FTAI & ICP.

Not all students will get desired results but there are ways to lessen the feelings of failure

Anne McCormack Irish Times – Tuesday 11th August 2015

Planning ahead and thinking about ways to cope with possible disappointment may be useful for results day.

Disappointment is an inevitable part of life. Everyone feels it at some point and it can be a difficult feeling for any person to bear. But disappointment has value, as all emotions do. Disappointment is of great value, as it bears witness to hope.

Many young people have high hopes on Leaving Cert results day. These hopes often relate to receiving enough points to access the third-level course of their choice. And some might feel disappointment.

While the prospect of planning for the possibility of disappointment may seem pessimistic, it is worth giving the possibility some thought.

It gives you the chance to become prepared psychologically, in case disappointment on Leaving Cert results day enters the frame.

Here are some ways to think about and deal with disappointment. By taking the time to reflect on these ideas, young people will be more prepared to handle this difficult emotion, and the disappointment will then be less likely to overwhelm.
Tuning in to thoughts as well as feelings

Disappointment can be intense. It can seem as if the event, the Leaving Cert results, is directly causing this unwanted feeling: I got this result, therefore I feel disappointment. It is important to know that it is the thoughts about the event, rather than just the event itself, that causes the feeling to arise. Therefore, I got this result and am now thinking this, is the cause of the feeling. By tuning into and by challenging these thoughts, young people can gain strength and influence over their emotional self and feel better.
Plan who to talk to for support

It can be useful for young people to think ahead and make a plan about who they will talk to if they are feeling disappointed.

If a young person’s peer group are all receiving results on the same day, it could be that a trusted friend may be largely unavailable to offer emotional support that particular day, if required. Someone at home, perhaps a parent, could be in a better position to really listen to how the young person is feeling.

For a parent to offer this support is useful. Then, by listening to the expression of disappointment, parents can check in with the young person about what they are thinking about. This provides an opportunity to steer their thinking away from negative thoughts which could damage their self-esteem.

Take a wider, longer-term view

There is always more than one way to get from A to B but on results day, it is hard to remember this as many young people have route A, their preferred first choice, very much in mind. No matter what career a young person has set their heart on, there is always the possibility of pursuing that goal, no matter what the exam results are.

It is important for parents to remind young people of this, ahead of results day as well as on the day itself, if they are feeling disappointed. It is also good to remind young people not to put pressure on themselves to figure out an alternative route straight away.

Taking a few days to process the emotions they are feeling is enough for the young person to deal with.

Celebrate effort more than results

There is a lot of emphasis placed on the points system and the number of points received. This can create the impression that results matter more than effort, but that is not necessarily the case.

In many areas of life, whether it is within relationships, within a workplace context or pursuing a life goal, effort matters a very great deal indeed.

Young people on results day may believe that results matter more than effort. But holding this belief does not make it a fact. It is vital for young people to be reminded of the validity and importance of effort. It is vital also that they be encouraged to celebrate effort, rather than just results.

Celebrating efforts made throughout the exam period and throughout the school life has much merit. Parents can take a lead by placing focus on and congratulating effort.

IQ versus EQ

The Leaving Cert does not take account of many an individual’s worthy qualities. Points are not awarded for kindness, a person’s level of honesty or a person’s social skills and yet these qualities matter a very great deal.

Research from Harvard Business School showed that emotional intelligence was twice as important as intellectual intelligence and technical skill when it came to determining who would be successful in life. In order for a person to become emotionally intelligent, a person must be able to experience empathy.

In order to experience empathy, a person must first be able to tune into and feel their own emotions deeply. There is an opportunity with disappointment to do just this; to feel deeply, to bear difficult emotion. And that can be a significant aspect of success.

Results day is significant, but it does not determine how the future will be. Young people may need to be reminded of that.
Anne Mc Cormack is a family therapist accredited to FTAI & ICP.

Attachment Narrative Therapy: an 8-day training: Arlene Vetere and Rudi Dallos

Arlene

Rudi

Dates: 4 Thursday/Friday blocks – 24-25 November and 15-16 December, 2016 and 12-13 January and 9-10 February, 2017 at the Institute of Family Therapy, London.

 

This course provides training in how to implement an attachment narrative based approach to systemic therapy and practice. It is grounded in an integration of modern attachment theory and narrative theory with systemic theory and practice.  The course provides skills based training and consultation to participants’ practice combined with small group work, video illustration of practice and didactic presentation.

 

Rudi Dallos is professor and Research Director on the D Clin Psychology training programme at the University of Plymouth who has conducted a wide range of family research. He has recently produced the 4th Edn of an Introduction to Family Therapy and has also co-authored a book on Attachment and Family Therapy with Patricia Crittenden.

 

Arlene Vetere is professor of family therapy and systemic practice at VID Specialized University, Oslo, Norway. She is a clinical psychologist (HCPC reg), systemic psychotherapist (UKCP reg) and a systemic supervisor (AFT reg).

 

Arlene and Rudi co-authored: Systemic Therapy and Attachment Narratives, 2009, Routledge.

For more information and to apply please go to http://www.ift.org.uk/workshops-conferences/attachment-narrative-therapy-an-8-day-training/

 

 

 

 

 

SYSTEMIC THERAPY AS TRANSFORMATIVE PRACTICE

 

SYSTEMIC THERAPY AS TRANSFORMATIVE PRACTICE
Eds.   Imelda McCarthy &  Gail Simon                                                                                                                          ISBN 978-0-9930723-2-1
Systemic Therapy as Transformative Practice is a substantial collection of writings on innovative, contemporary practice from leading edge therapists around the world. The book showcases ground-breaking systemic practice from Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, England, Canada, Sweden and USA.  The writings address connections between change in smaller and wider systems, connecting local with global – all against a backdrop of massive economic and social instability worldwide. The writers share stories from their everyday working lives with creative reflections on the intersections of systemic, social constructionist, narrative, dialogical, appreciative, constructivist and collaborative theories.

For further details, please click on link below

Systemic Therapy as Transformative Practice flyer

Systemic Café 11th April 2016 – Drinking, Relationships & Psychotherapy

Date:              11th April 2016

Time:             7.00pm – 9.00pm

Venue:           The Schoolhouse Hotel, 2-8, Northumberland Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4.

 

Topic:           Drinking, Relationships & Psychotherapy:

                       Who is afraid of the alcohol question in therapy?   Why?

Speakers:

Mary Scully:  Mary worked for many years in a frontline mental health service as a CNS family therapist. Currently working in private practice as Systemic Supervisor and Trainer on the faculty of the Mater family therapy training programme.

Monica Whyte: Monica has worked with alcohol using clients and their families in the public service for many years. A family therapist and  systemic supervisor she currently holds the chair of the NFTO chamber of EFTA.

Brian Raftery :Brian has many years experience in a frontline alcohol service. He is currently engaged in studying for BA in Psychotherapy.

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) = 2 hours. CPD certificates will be issued by the Family Therapy Assoc. of Ireland (FTAI).     See you @ the Systemic Café

Systemic Cafe 11th April 2016

M.Sc/PG Dip in Systemic Psychotherapy Family Therapy -Clanwilliam Institute

M.Sc. / PG Dip in Systemic Psychotherapy
Family Therapy

Clanwilliam Institute invites applications for the MSc in Systemic Psychotherapy for the 2016/2017 academic year, a four year part-time programme which is available in Dublin and Galway (with sufficient enrolment). This student-centred teaching approach provides a comprehensive approach that draws upon three principal theoretical and philosophical influences of systems theory, social constructionism, and the perspective of ethics.

Clanwilliam Institute is a registered charity, whose mission is to provide high quality accessible services to the general public. The values of excellence, accountability, and transparency guided by ethical rigour and best practices inform all the Institute’s activities.

This programme is academically accredited by QQI and professionally accredited by FTAI and EAP. This comprehensive part-time training in Family Therapy has particular relevance for professionals in the health, social services, education, and related disciplines. Usual requirements for entrance are a primary degree in a field of study in the human sciences. Applicants who are not entitled to direct entry may be considered for entry on the basis of their prior learning.

We are currently accepting applications for this programme with application and relevant information available at http://www.clanwilliam.ie/msc-in-systemic-therapy/ and any enquiries can be addressed to the Clanwilliam Institute at 01 67613663 or to trainingadmin@clanwilliam.ie.

We are holding an information evening on April 20, 2016 starting at 16:30. If you would like, you can express your interest for the evening or the programme by contacting us.

Systemic Café: Working Systemically within Hierarchies 25th January 2016

DATE FOR YOUR DIARY

 Date:              25th January 2016

 Time:             7.00pm – 9.00pm

Venue:            The Schoolhouse Hotel, 2-8, Northumberland Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4.

Topic:            Working Systemically within Hierarchies

Given the hierarchical nature of our current educational system, the Café will focus on using a Systemic approach to engage with challenging and distressed young people in schools.

Speakers:

David Carter:   Principal, St. Paul’s School, Finglas

Peter Caffrey: Family Therapist, St. Paul’s School, Finglas

Marian Deaton: Senior Social Worker & Family Therapist, HSE Dublin North City & County CAMHS.

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) = 2 hours. CPD certificates will be issued by the Family Therapy Assoc. of Ireland (FTAI).    

 

Date for your Diary Systemic Cafe 25th January 2016

 

 

Working with Couples: Philosophies, Formats and Processes. Workshop with Prof. Jim Sheehan

This event is co-sponsored by the Family Therapy Association of Ireland and University College Dublin (Family Therapy Training Programme, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital)

 

Working with Couples:

Philosophies, Formats and Processes

 

One Day Workshop

with

Prof. Jim Sheehan

Thursday 12th November 2015

10.00a.m – 4.00.p.m

Registration: 9.30a.m

 

Morrison Hotel, Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin 1

 

Places limited – please book early

 

5 CPD points apply

 JIM SHEEHAN is a Social Worker and Family Therapist. He was Director of Family

Therapy Training with the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital for many years

and is still engaged in teaching there. His primary teaching responsibilities are now in

the Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, where he has been part-time

Professor of Family Therapy and Systemic Practice since 2005. Jim has an extensive

Dublin-based private practice in Couple and Family Therapy and has provided

workshops for professionals on couple-related themes in several European countries

over the last decade. He has recently completed the co-editing of a book on Personal

and Professional Development in Counselling and Psychotherapy with some other

European colleagues and this work is due to be published by Routledge in January 2016.

Click on link below for further details:

Jim Sheehan Workshop 12th November 2015

 

Systemic Cafe 28th September 2015 – Integrating Crossdressing: A toolkit

Date:              28th September 2015

 

Time:             7.00pm – 9.00pm

 

Venue:           The Schoolhouse Hotel,  2-8, Northumberland Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4.

                     

Topic:            Integrating Crossdressing: A toolkit

 

Speakers:

Gloria Jameson:  Happily married for 25 years, Gloria Jameson is a lifelong crossdresser and has been out in the Dublin scene for nearly two decades.  Gloria recently founded an information website about transvestism in Ireland www.thehiddenpeople.ie

 

Dermod Moore: Psychotherapist, Trainer, and current chair of IAHIP, Dermod lectures in psychosexual psychotherapy, and is experienced in writing about, and working with, sexual and gender difference.

 

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) = 2 hours. CPD certificates will be issued by the Family Therapy Assoc. of Ireland (FTAI).     See you @ the Systemic Café

Systemic Cafe 28th September 2015 Integrating Crossdressing